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MARTIAL ARTS TRAINING FOR CHILDREN

kids-groupHave you ever seen a bad kid? Have you ever seen a kid with low self-esteem? Have you ever seen a kid that’s been bullied and pushed around so much that they think it’s normal for things to be that way and that it’s their fault? Let me tell you something when you teach youngsters (no matter what it is that you teach them) you see it all the time.

There are times when you have to build up the inner person as well as the outer. When you have to teach the kid how to handle the conflicts inside themselves, as well as the conflicts that they may face out on the street. You must teach them respect for others, by first teaching them to respect themselves. If you think that it’s easy and that you have a fool proof formula that works every time you’re living in a dream world, and are too blind, or daft to realize it.

In some situations the martial arts can help with the problems. Notice the word some, not all. There’s nothing more gratifying in the world than to see someone who had walked into your dojo several weeks before who doesn’t smile, or talk to the others in class start to interact with them. Or to see his grades start to rise, or even hear the parents remark on how his or her behavior has changed.

How does one accomplish these amazing feats? The first step is you have to care enough to sit and talk with your students and get involved with them. Your part in their lives doesn’t begin and end when they walk into martial art schools. Take ownership for the student. Request to see their progress reports. Make schoolwork part of their advancement requirements. If you do that though you had best be ready to clear out some cobwebs out of your head and lend the kid a hand if they need it. It helps if you’ve got some students that can help them out, and helps to develop bonds in the class.

That brings up the second point, if there’s a problem you have to talk with the parents. This can be the most difficult part of the job. A word of warning when dealing with parents, diplomacy and self-restraint are the watchwords of the day. Constructive criticism in this situation should not be used. Rather
say you’ve noticed certain behaviors ask their opinion on what should be done. Try and forge a synergic relationship with these people. After all two heads are better than one  and they only want the best for their children, as do we all. I’ll tell you now  the parents can be part of the problem  so tread with care. 

Third you must show pride in their accomplishments. A word of encouragement can be fuel for success to those who so often run on empty. Yes, you have to correct mistakes that you see; but make more positive deposits in the emotional bank than negative withdrawals.

The fourth important factor is patience. Rome wasn’t built in a day and these kids are not going to solve their problems overnight. It really is their job to solve them not yours. You just have to be there for them to offer support, insight if you have it or better yet, sit there with your mouth closed and just listen. Seek to understand before you attempt to be understood.

So what are the benefits you ask? For starters self-esteem and this can be a big one. How can you expect a person to be successes in life if they have never succeeded in anything else before? Success is a habit that is cultivated and nurtured not a God given right. Set goals and projects before them which are attainable and then help and encourage them until they succeed. Then help them to realize that they succeeded and that it was their accomplishment.

When you build the students self–esteem their sense of self worth grows. When they can see themselves for the unique and valuable individual that they are, then they can appreciate others for themselves. You must respect yourself before you can respect others.

Karate classes teach other ways to express themselves than through violence. The arts teach when violence is acceptable and how to avoid conflict. Self-control is a hard commodity to come by but will stand them in good stead as they progress in life.

The arts teach self-discipline, teamwork, and a sense of responsibility. Quitting and casting blame on others is a whole lot easier than forging ahead against adversity and accepting responsibility for both the results of your own actions as well as the attainment of the goal. It’s only through internal strength that we succeed in the task that is set for us either by ourselves, or others.

Martial Arts was developed out of a sense of self-preservation to defend ones self from attack from others. However spears and swords aren’t the only dangers that face the martial artist of today. Self-doubt, feelings of worthlessness and the inability to deal with day-to-day conflicts in a productive manner pose as big a threat to the soul, as do weapons to the body. For so fares the soul so fares the body. If you can help one child to see the beauty in them and others, then you may look around and realize that things look a little better to you. There is no endeavor more worthy than the development and education of our future.

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Newest Black Belts at PMA!

Congratulations to our newest Black Belts!

Congratulations to our newest Black Belts!

Congratulations to our newest 1st Degree Black Belts!   Thomas Kim, Wesley Hutcheson, Anthony Martinez, Chase Mangalindan, and Jonathan Jesus were awarded this special honor.

Also going for their Black Belt – Recommended were Jeremy Faulkner, Gabriel Gallego, Grace Scoggin, Shivani Gupta, and Ben Olsen. They are each scheduled to test for their 1st Degree this summer in June.

Each has proven worthy of this rank through all of their training and practice, by displaying a Black belt Attitude at Martial Arts, school, and at home, through their Perseverance and passing a series of  grueling tests. They were awarded their new belts at a Graduation Ceremony. 

We would also like to recognize Meredith Wood, a great role model to each of these new Black Belts. Her dedication and example is an inspiration to every student at Premier Martial Arts – South Austin Karate location.

We are very proud of everyone of them and their accomplishments!

Premier Martial Arts Tournament Info. – Feb. 28, 2009

Premier Martial Arts Tournament

Premier Martial Arts Tournament

 

Premier Martial Arts Tournament

 
 

 

 All children & adult students are invited & encouraged to attend.

 

 

Tournament Information

Where: Premier Martial Arts,
920 Pat Booker Road, Universal City, TX 78148
210-566-0020

www.pmauniversalcity.com

 

When: Saturday, February 28th 2009
Sign In: 8:30 am
Black Belt Meeting: 8:45 am
National Anthem: 9:15 am
Events Begin: 9:30 am

Divisions will be combined if less then four competitors per level OR divided if more than 10 per level
Beginner – White, Yellow, Orange ♦ Intermediate – Purple, Blue, Green ♦ Advanced – Red, Brown + ♦ Black

Tournament Fees
Dates Fee
Pre-registration: now – Jan 31 $25
Jan 31 – Feb 14 $35
Feb 15 Closed
Fee covers two Events only
Additional Events $10

Spectators
Adults – 13 and up $5
Children – 6 – 12 yrs $2
Children 5 and under Free
Adults 65 and older Free

Safety Equipment:
Required: Optional:
* Mouth guards * Shin gear
* Foam / vinyl equipment for * Chest / rib guards
Hands, feet, & head
* Athletic cups / supporters

DIVISIONS: Sparring – Open Hand Forms – Weapons Forms

3-4 yr old – Beginner
3-4 yr old – Intermediate
3-4 yr old – advanced

5-7 yr old – Beginner
5-7 yr old – Intermediate
5-7 yr old – advanced

8-9 yr old – Beginner
8-9 yr old – Intermediate
8-9 yr old – advanced

10-12 yr old – Beginner
10-12 yr old – Intermediate
10-12 yr old – advanced

Girls
13-14 yr old – Beginner
13-14 yr old – Intermediate
13-14 yr old – advanced
13-14 yr old – Black

Boys
13-14 yr old – Beginner
13-14 yr old – Intermediate
13-14 yr old – advanced
13-14 yr old – Black

Girls
15-17 yr old – Beginner
15-17 yr old – Intermediate
15-17 yr old – advanced
15-17 yr old – Black

Boys
15-17 yr old – Beginner
15-17 yr old – Intermediate
15-17 yr old – advanced
15-17 yr old – Black

Women
18-35 yr old – Beginner
18-35 yr old – Intermediate
18-35 yr old – advanced
18-35 yr old – Black

Men
18-35 yr old – Beginner
18-35 yr old – Intermediate
18-35 yr old – advanced
18-35 yr old – Black

Women
36 & up – Beginner
36 & up – Intermediate
36 & up – advanced
36 & up – Black

Men
36 & up – Beginner
36 & up – Intermediate
36 & up – advanced
36 & up – Black

GRAND CHAMPION!
All 1st place winners from each forms division (open hand & weapon), 15 yrs old and up,
advanced belt and up, will compete for Grand Champion

Teach the children . . .

Posted in Premier "KARATE KIDZ" by Katie on December 19, 2008
Tags: , , ,
Keep the Christmas Spirit!

Keep the Christmas Spirit!

Late one Christmas Eve, I sank back, tired but content, into my easy chair. The kids were in bed, the gifts were wrapped, the milk and cookies waited by the fireplace for Santa. As I sat back admiring the tree with its decorations, I couldn’t help feeling that something important was missing. It wasn’t long before the tiny twinkling tree lights lulled me to sleep.

I don’t know how long I slept, but all of a sudden I knew that I wasn’t alone. I opened my eyes, and you can imagine my surprise when I saw Santa Claus himself standing next to my Christmas tree. He was dressed all in fur from his head to his foot just as the poem described him, but he was not the “jolly old elf” of Christmas legend. The man who stood before me looked sad and disappointed, and there were tears in his eyes.

“Santa, what’s wrong?” I asked, “Why are you crying?”

“It’s the children,” Santa replied sadly.

“But Santa, the children love you,” I said.

“Oh, I know they love me, and they love the gifts I bring them,” Santa said, “but the children of today seem to have somehow missed out on the true spirit of Christmas. It’s not their fault. It’s just that the adults, many of them not having been taught themselves, have forgotten to teach the children.”

“Teach them what?” I asked.

Santa’s kind old face became soft, more gentle. His eyes began to shine with something more than tears. He spoke softly. “Teach the children the true meaning of Christmas. Teach them that the part of Christmas we can see, hear, and touch is much more than meets the eye. Teach them the symbolism behind the customs and traditions of Christmas which we now observe. Teach them what it is they truly represent.”

Santa reached into his bag and pulled out a tiny Christmas tree and set it on my mantle. “Teach them about the Christmas tree. Green is the second color of Christmas. The stately evergreen, with its unchanging color, represents the hope of eternal life in Jesus. Its needles point heavenward as a reminder that mankind’s thoughts should turn heavenward as well.”

Santa reached into his bag again and pulled out a shiny star and placed it at the top of the small tree. “The star was the heavenly sign of promise. God promised a Savior for the world and the star was the sign of the fulfillment of that promise on the night that Jesus Christ was born. Teach the children that God always fulfills His promises, and that wise men still seek Him.”

“Red,” said Santa, “is the first color of Christmas.” “He pulled forth a red ornament for the tiny tree. Red is deep, intense, vivid. It is the color of the life-giving blood that flows through our veins. It is the symbol of God’s greatest gift. Teach the children that Christ gave his life and shed his blood for them that they might have eternal life. When they see the color red, it should remind them of that most wonderful gift.”

Santa found a silver bell in his pack and placed it on the tree. “Just as lost sheep are guided to safety by the sound of the bell, it continues to ring today for all to be guided to the fold. Teach the children to follow the true Shepherd, who gave His life for the sheep.”

Santa placed a candle on the mantle and lit it. The soft glow from its one tiny flame brightened the room. “The glow of the candle represents how people can show their thanks for the gift of God’s son that Christmas Eve long ago. Teach the children to follow in Christ’s foot steps…to go about doing good. Teach them to let their light so shine before people that all may see it and glorify God. This is what is symbolized when the twinkle lights shine on the tree like hundreds of bright, shining candles, each of them representing one of God’s precious children, their light shining for all to see.”

Again Santa reached into his bag and this time he brought forth a tiny red and white striped cane. As he hung it on the tree he spoke softly. “The candy cane is a stick of hard white candy. White to symbolize the virgin birth and sinless nature of Jesus, and hard to symbolize the Solid Rock the foundation of the church, and the firmness of God’s promises. The candy cane is in the form of a “J” to represent the precious name of Jesus, who came to earth. It also represents the Good Shepherd’s crook, which He uses to reach down into the ditches of the world to lift out the fallen lambs who, like all sheep, have gone astray. The original candy cane had three small red stripes, which are the stripes of the scourging Jesus received by which we are healed, and a large red stripe that represents the shed blood of Jesus, so that we can have the promise of eternal life.

“Teach these things to the children.”

Santa brought out a beautiful wreath made of fresh, fragrant greenery tied with a bright red bow. “The bow reminds us of the bond of perfection, which is love. The wreath embodies all the good things about Christmas for those with eyes to see and hearts to understand. It contains the colors of red and green and the heaven-turned needles of the evergreen. The bow tells the story of good will towards all and its color reminds us of Christ’s sacrifice. Even its very shape is symbolic, representing eternity and the eternal nature of Christ’s love. It is a circle, without beginning and without end. These are the things you must teach the children.”

I asked, “But where does that leave you, Santa?”

The tears gone now from his eyes, a smile broke over Santa’s face. “Why bless you, my dear,” he laughed, “I’m only a symbol myself. I represent the spirit of family fun and the joy of giving and receiving. If the children are taught these other things, there is no danger that I’ll ever be forgotten.”

“I think I’m beginning to understand.”

“That’s why I came,” said Santa. “You’re an adult. If you don’t teach the children these things, then who will?”